LaborArts.org has images to expand your experience of our films

Thanks to the wonderful folks at LaborArts.org, the labor movement's vitally important online repository of images from all eras of labor and worker history, Workers Unite Film Festival is able to offer our viewers the ability to dig deeper. We invite you to explore one of our festival's main themes – Civil Rights – through some remarkable historic images in the online exhibits featured below. We are developing our partnership with LaborArts toward a real searchable resource for filmmakers, students, educators, workers and labor union organizers, not to mention anybody else who is interested in finding out more about these incredible, under-reported historical events.

Many thanks to Evelyn Jones Rich and Rachel Bernstein, co-founders and directors of LaborArts and its online museum, and huge thanks to Donald and Shelley Rubin and The Rubin Foundation, for their ongoing support and guidance to both LaborArts and our own Workers Unite Film Festival.


A sampling of materials from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), part of Marvin Rich’s collection from his time as a civil rights activist. Learn more

A sampling of materials from the Congress of
Racial Equality (CORE), part of Marvin Rich’s
collection from his time as a civil rights activist.
Learn more

Acclaimed singer and civil rights leader Paul Robeson spent a lifetime fighting racial discrimination, and he developed a deep connection to the National Maritime Union’s fight to integrate America’s ships. Listen to recordings of some of his songs, and a story about his experiences aboard one ship. Learn More  

Acclaimed singer and civil rights leader Paul
Robeson spent a lifetime fighting racial
discrimination, and he developed a deep
connection to the National Maritime Union’s
fight to integrate America’s ships. Listen to
recordings of some of his songs, and a story
about his experiences aboard one ship.
Learn More
 

Artwork played a key role in the magazine W.E.B. Du Bois founded in 1910. Unlike images of African Americans in other magazines, the visuals published here were generated from a black perspective – tied to political and social issues of the day, yet reflecting Du Bois’ attempt to help build a collective memory for black people beyond that shaped by the white-dominated culture they lived within. Learn More  

Artwork played a key role in the magazine
W.E.B. Du Bois founded in 1910. Unlike images of
African Americans in other magazines, the
visuals published here were generated from
a black perspective – tied to political and
social issues of the day, yet reflecting Du
Bois’ attempt to help build a collective
memory for black people beyond that shaped
by the white-dominated culture they lived
within. Learn More
 

Featuring art by Marshall Arisman, Nina Talbot, Audrey Flack, and others. Learn More

Featuring art by Marshall Arisman,
Nina Talbot, Audrey Flack, and
others. Learn More